Photos of clear cuts on Lookout Ridge and headwaters of Digger Creek

 

Photos taken July 24, 2011

Clear cuts line up like a parade over the ridges of Battle Creek before Mt. Lassen and Broke Off Mountain. More than 600 clear cuts have been approved by the State of California for the watershed. They've just begun and will seem continuous as they will all be clear cut again and again as the trees are replanted in plantation style. After each cut the land is sprayed with herbacides which kill everything in the cut area. Erosion from the cut areas is accelerated and the poison flows into the streams.
Many of the clear cuts are on steep hillsides. Many are directly above and next to steams critical for salmon recovery. Erosion from the cuts will flow quickly into the streams.

Sediment from the cut areas washes into the streams. Both events ruin the streams for fish. Water temperatures, crucial for salmon, rises without the shade from the trees. Sediment clogging up the stream beds destroys fish spawning habitat.

Marily points to ribbons designating cut areas. This one is directly above a stream important for salmon recovery.

 

Everywhere one looks on the ridge clear cuts are just finished or in progress.

 

 

Clear cuts are often on incredibly steep hillsides.
Streams immediately in the path of imminent erosion are quickly becoming inhospitable to salmon.

Healthy forests next to private property like this next to the Order of St. John Monastery are scheduled to be clear cut.

 

 

Bluff Springs

a Battle Creek headwaters surrounded by scheduled clear cuts. The natural wonders of Battle Creek are in display here. Old growth cedar, ponderosa preside over spring fed waterfalls.


Battle Creek restoration will return salmon to habitat that has been shut off for decades. The project involves demolishing five dams and creating fish passages around the other six.

web resources:

http://www.thebattlecreekalliance.org

http://www.pelicannetwork.net/stopclearcut.htm

http://www.pelicannetwork.net/battlecreekvisit.htm

 

 

 

"In the end, we will conserve only what we love; We will love only what we understand:

And, we will understand only what we are taught."

Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist